Social Studies

Sixth Grade:

World History and Geography: Early Civilizations through the Decline of the Roman Empire (5th century C.E.)  

Sixth grade students will study the beginning of early civilizations through the fall of the Roman Empire. Students will analyze the shift from nomadic societies to agricultural societies and the development of civilizations, including the areas of Mesopotamia, Egypt, India, China, Ancient Israel, Greece, and Rome. The sixth grade will conclude with the decline and fall of the Roman Empire. Appropriate informational texts and primary sources will be used in order to deepen the understanding of how these civilizations influenced the modern world.

Seventh Grade:

World History and Geography: The Middle Ages to the Exploration of the Americas

Seventh grade students will explore the changes that occurred after the fall of the Roman Empire and in Medieval Europe. Students will also study the period from the fifteenth to the eighteenth century, including the Islamic world, Africa, China, and Japan, but with a heavier emphasis on western civilization in Europe during the Renaissance and Reformation. Seventh grade students will end the year by examining the Meso-American and Andean civilizations, and the age of European explorations. Appropriate informational texts and primary sources will be used in order to deepen the understanding of how these civilizations influenced the modern world. 

Eighth Grade:

United States History and Geography:  Colonization of North America to Reconstruction and the American West

Eighth grade students will study European exploration of North America, along with early settlements and colonies. This course will emphasize the political, cultural, and economic influences that led the British colonies to the American Revolution. Major events of the American Revolution, along with individuals who were instrumental in the development of our new nation and its government, will be studied. The impact of westward expansion and Manifest Destiny will be analyzed, including implications on domestic and foreign policy. Events leading up to the Civil War will be examined, along with individuals and events that were significant during the war. The history, people, government, and geography of Tennessee will be emphasized to show our State’s role in American history. Reconstruction and the development of the American West will conclude this course.  Informational text and primary sources will used to support the course content where appropriate.

Ninth or Tenth Grade:

Honors World History and Geography: The Industrial Revolution to the Contemporary World

Ninth or tenth grade students will study the history of the World from the Age of Revolution through the present day.  Special emphasis will be given to the following time periods and or events:

Age of Revolution 1750-1850; The Industrial Revolution 1750-1914; Unification and Imperialism 1850-1914; World Wars 1914-1945; Cold War 1945-1989; Contemporary World Since 1989. Informational text and primary sources will used to support the course content where appropriate.

Eleventh Grade:

Advanced Placement United States History

Eleventh grade students will explore American history from Reconstruction following the Civil War to modern day.   The causes and consequences of the Industrial Revolution, the Spanish-American War and World War I will be examined. Students will study the accomplishments of the Progressive Movement and the New Deal.  Students will explore the factors that led to WWII as well as the consequences to American life.  Their studies will also include the causes and course of the Cold War.  The Civil Rights Movement will be analyzed for its social, cultural, economic and political impact.  Throughout the course, students will read their text accompanied by primary sources.

Through Directed Studies sessions, students taking the Advanced Placement Exam will reach further back into history by studying Christopher Columbus, the Spanish and Portuguese explorers, and the settling of our thirteen colonies.  Colony life, the American Revolution, the Constitution, and our Republican form of government will be examined.  Students will explore our founding fathers and presidents as their survey of history moves toward the War of 1812 and beyond. Through the Compromise of 1800 to the Compromise of 1850, students will study how sectionalism and slavery split our country, ultimately resulting in Civil War.  The AP curriculum embodies the use of textbook and primary readings in order to respond to essential questions in essay format.  Students who take the AP Exam receive an additional 5 points to their final average.

Twelfth Grade:

Economics

Twelfth grade students will examine the allocation of limited resources and the economic reasoning used by government agencies, consumers, producers, savers, investors, workers, and voters.  Key elements of the course include the study of scarcity, supply and demand, market structures, the role of government, national income determination, money and the role of financial institutions, economic stabilization, and trade.  Students will examine the key economic philosophies of economists who have influenced economies around the world. Informational and argumentative text, including primary sources where appropriate, will be instrumental in the study of economics.    (0.5 credit)

Twelfth Grade:

United States Government and Civics

Twelfth grade students will study the purposes, principles, and practices of American government as established by the Constitution. Emphasis will be given to the policies, laws and rulings stemming from the three branches of government and the impact of politics and factions.  Students are expected to understand their rights and responsibilities as citizens and how to exercise these rights and responsibilities in local, state, and national government.  Students will learn the structure and processes of national, state and local government.  Informational and argumentative text, including primary sources where appropriate, will be instrumental in the study and discussion of government, its policies and politics.    (0.5 credit)

Senior Seminar/Personal Finance (12th grade)

In these two capstone courses, seniors are introduced to the skills necessary to succeed beyond high school.  Transitional topics relative to college and adult life are introduced. The senior seminar teacher and college advisor work closely together in order to ease the college application, scholarship, and financial aid process.  In addition to financial aid topics, students will develop financial literacy through real-world examples and simulations.  Seniors will also demonstrate their academic, artistic, and communication strengths through their research on chosen topics, culminating in the development of products and presentations.  Students are expected to explore and contribute to their community by working with a mentor and completing community service.  Throughout these courses, students will develop portfolios reflective of their research, thoughts, goals, and personal growth.  Content from the two courses is lightly integrated throughout the senior year, although each course represents one semester.    (0.5 credit each)