2017 Solar Eclipse

Center for Creative Arts families:
Wow! What an exciting time to live in Tennessee! Our county is very close to the path of the total eclipse on August 21, 2017. Some in the northern most region of Hamilton County able to see the full eclipse and and the rest of us will see at least a 99% eclipse of the sun by the moon. While this is a historic opportunity, it is not without risks. Please be careful and read the following information provided by NASA about safe viewing of the eclipse (https://eclipse2017.nasa.gov/safety).

“Looking directly at the sun is unsafe except during the brief total phase of a solar eclipse (“totality”), when the moon entirely blocks the sun’s bright face, which will happen only within the narrow path of totality.” (Most of Hamilton County is NOT in the path of totality so for many of our families, it will never be safe to look at the sun without protection.)

“The only safe way to look directly at the uneclipsed or partially eclipsed sun is through special-purpose solar filters, such as “eclipse glasses” or hand-held solar viewers. Homemade filters or ordinary sunglasses, even very dark ones, are not safe for looking at the sun; they transmit thousands of times too much sunlight. Refer to the American Astronomical Society (AAS) page for a list of manufacturers and authorized dealers of eclipse glasses and handheld solar viewers verified to be compliant with the ISO 12312-2 international safety standard for such products (https://eclipse.aas.org/resources/solar-filters)

 Here are a few tips for using your eclipse glasses or solar viewer safely:

  • Stand still and cover your eyes with your eclipse glasses or solar viewer before looking up at the bright sun. After looking at the sun, turn away and remove your filter — do not remove it while looking at the sun.
  • Do not look at the uneclipsed or partially eclipsed sun through an unfiltered camera, telescope, binoculars, or other optical device.
  • Similarly, do not look at the sun through a camera, a telescope, binoculars, or any other optical device while using your eclipse glasses or hand-held solar viewer — the concentrated solar rays will damage the filter and enter your eye(s), causing serious injury. (Doing this can actually damage not only your eyes, but it can irreparably damage your phone, camera or binoculars!)
  • Seek expert advice from an astronomer before using a solar filter with a camera, a telescope, binoculars, or any other optical device. Note that solar filters must be attached to the frontof any telescope, binoculars, camera lens, or other optics.
  • If you are within the path of totality, remove your solar filter only when the moon completely covers the sun’s bright face and it suddenly gets quite dark. Experience totality, then, as soon as the bright sun begins to reappear, replace your solar viewer to look at the remaining partial phases.
  • Outside the path of totality (which will be almost everyone in Hamilton County), you must alwaysuse a safe solar filter to view the sun directly.
  • If you normally wear eyeglasses, keep them on. Put your eclipse glasses on over them, or hold your handheld viewer in front of them.

Note: If your eclipse glasses or viewers are compliant with the ISO 12312-2 safety standard, you may look at the uneclipsed or partially eclipsed Sun through them for as long as you wish as long as you have checked that the filters aren’t scratched, punctured, or torn.”

Thank you so much taking time to be informed. Be safe on Monday!

Post Author: Mrs. Zerr